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The boy’s father recalled a shift in his attitude that summer and had noticed he had bruises, some that looked like fingerprints. Whenever he asked, the boy would say “he didn’t remember where they were from.”

The five-year-old had attended the dayhome in July and August 2018.

A friend reached out to the boy’s parents in the summer of 2019, letting them know Langager had been arrested on July 15 and charged with assault. His father then asked his son about the bruises, and his son told him that he hadn’t said anything because “he didn’t want to get in trouble.”

In his interview with a detective, the boy said he would be held up and smacked, and that the beatings “made my heart so sad.”

The 19-month-old was dropped off at the dayhome on March 11, 2019, and when the boy’s father picked him up, he “seemed very pale; his eyes were very large; he looked at his father; and, was not really happy to see him, which his father said was not his normal reaction.”

He spoke with Langager, who pointed out that the child seemed to have a rash behind his ear and on his chest. They discussed the rash and the boy’s father decided it was best to take him to a walk-in clinic.

He was told the 19-month-old had broken blood vessels and that he should follow up with their family doctor. He was taken to the Children’s Hospital by both parents. The petechiae got worse, turning blue and staying for two or three weeks.

Dr. Jennifer D’Mello, a child abuse expert doctor, testified that she saw the 19-month-old when his parents brought him in and said the petechiae was a concern for inflicted injury.

In her opinion, there was “no medical cause for the petechiae on the child’s head and neck, and the smaller petechia areas on his upper chest and behind his knee.”

The judge said Langager’s testimony was vague and had many inconsistencies. Skene wrote that she found him guilty of both assaults.

sbabych@postmedia.com
Twitter: @BabychStephanie

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